Litto Gomez Diez 2013 Cigars Shipping Soon

October 30, 2013 · Posted in Cigar Industry · Comment 

I’m very much looking forward to this as the Litto Gomez Diez 2012 Chisel is my favorite cigar and I’m hoping that the 2013 is just as good (dare I hope for it to be even better?). Until they arrive take a look at a picture they recently posted on their Facebook Page of these delicious beauties.

Litto Gomez Diez 2013 cigars ready to ship (click on image to go to their Facebook update on this)

Litto Gomez Diez 2013 cigars ready to ship (click on image to go to their Facebook update on this)

Are you looking forward to any cigars being released shortly?

Litto Gomez Diez 2012 Cigar Review

September 19, 2012 · Posted in Cigar Review · Comment 

A couple of months ago I reviewed the Litto Gomez Diez 2010 Chisel and thought that it was a good cigar and gave it 90 points. For me, the flavor was a little muted during the first two thirds but that last third was pretty awesome. It’s a good cigar and I would suggest smoking one if you get the opportunity. But what if you had to choose between the 2010 and 2012 LGD Chisels?

Fortunately for you, I am going to give you some advice because I’m about to start reviewing the LG Diez 2012 Chisel… Right now.

Normally, I do not comment on the way the cigar smells unlit but this one just exudes this spicy, hay-infused aroma. It’s a very dry smell and only adds to my anticipation of this cigar.

It’s a Chisel, it looks flawless, it doesn’t have any veins, is fairly oily and has a slightly loose pack. Enough with this prelude to a smoke, let’s smoke.

LFD Litto Gomez Diez Chisel (click picture to go to La Flor Dominicana's site)

LFD Litto Gomez Diez Chisel (click picture to go to La Flor Dominicana’s site)

Cigar Stats
Vitola: Chisel ~ robusto
Length: 5 ½”
Ring Gauge: 54
Wrapper: Dominican Republic
Binder: Dominican Republic
Filler: Dominican Republic
Price: $265.25/Box of 24 | $11.05/Single

Hallucinatory Scorching!

During my review of the Litto Gomez Diez 2010 Chisel I basically likened the final third flavors to a dream come true. That’s good but it was only that good for a third of the cigar. The LG Diez 2012 is starting off like a dream with this amazing spice flavor that is both bitter and hot all at once and there’s also dark fruit, dry hay and some savory notes that most closely resembles a fine steak.

If I were forced to identify something negative with the first third, or at least something others might not like about the first third, it is that the flavors are extremely intense; intense to the point that they might overpower some people’s palates. I’m okay with it, I loved it. It’s also very full bodied, which is another matter altogether for some people (this is not an admonition, it’s just that some people do not like full bodied cigars, that’s all).

The second third ameliorates any concern I have with this cigar’s flavors being too powerful for some people (the strength of body is still there, if not a tick higher than during the first third). And it has increased my enjoyment of this cigar a bit because the flavors seem to have more freedom and life to them. What I’m getting now is a ton of spice, which is a combination of cinnamon and heat. Dryness is the name of the game here, this is a very dry cigar. And that is perfect for this flavor profile, which, during this second third, is, as aforementioned, spice and, mostly, meat with some sweetness added in almost as an afterthought.

After finishing the final third I am still supremely impressed by this cigar. Heck, I was extremely impressed with the three others that I smoked before this one (two of another vitola, forget which, and a Chisel). During this third I predominately got that very dry and intense spice along with some oak. All signs of sweetness and meat have disappeared. The previous two thirds were better but the final third was great in its own way.

Definitely full bodied with a great draw and a decent burn, this cigar is a treat. It is too full bodied for those who don’t normally go for full bodied cigars but, for those of you who do, this is one of those cigars that you must try at least once.

97 points

PS: I did wrestle with the score quite a bit. I’m guessing that more people will probably like this cigar more than the Fausto Avion 11, which received a 98 from me, but I could be wrong. Initially, I was going to give it a score of 99 points (one point off 100 due to the burn) but then the burn acted up a little too much and the final third wasn’t perfect. This is most definitely not a criticism but, at least the way I see it, when I am deciding which cigar is my favorite I have to go after every last detail.

The other LGD 2012 Chisel I smoked also had some burn issues but the other vitola, which is a normal parejo, didn’t have those burn issues. Part of the problem with the LGD 2012 Chisels is that I may have just let the cigar rest too long in between puffs but, if I had done that, I do not think the cigar would have performed as well flavor-wise. It was better that I smoked it slowly and corrected a few burn issues, which included the cigar basically going out, than to have risked the flavor profile turning bad by smoking it too quickly.

Litto Gomez Diez 2010 Cigar Review

July 24, 2012 · Posted in Cigar Review · Comment 

It’s a Chisel™ and what that means is I will probably like it. My favorite Chisel (I will dispense with the ™ thing because I don’t think you care) is the LFD Double Ligero Maduro but I also loved the LFD Double Ligero Natural and LFD Air Bender. All were great cigars and all should be smoked by people who like full bodied cigars and flavor. The latter part is the only part that really matters though.

The Litto Gomez Diez 2010 Chisel is a Dominican puro with a light brown wrapper. When I see this wrapper I am still surprised at how light it is. Still, it is a La Flor Dominicana Chisel so you know the quality will be there.

Or will it? Usually, that is the case. However, the first one of these that I smoked had a tight draw that hurt the cigar. It was a bummer.

The wrapper looks good and so does the shape. Nicely packed with no soft or hard spots and with no raised veins are evident.

Cigar Stats
Vitola: Chisel ~ robusto
Length: 5 ½”
Ring Gauge: 54.5
Wrapper: Dominican Republic
Binder: Dominican Republic
Filler: Dominican Republic
Price: $17.00/Single @ Embassy Cigars

Walking Dead 3 Incineration!

Unfortunately, the flavors start out muted, almost shy. Very faint, not subtle, just faint hay and cashews. After a third to half an inch some spice enters the mix, which does improve the overall flavor profile.

With the first third’s flavors being nearly transparent I was hoping for an improvement during the second third. And there is a slight improvement with the flavors ratcheting up a peg or two. Spice and hay are the main flavors. Some dark sweetness sneaks in during this third as well and it does morph into sweet wood. There is also buttered toast during this third.

Before I go onto the final third I have to make a bit of a detour and explain why the flavors for this cigar are muted (I’m sure most of you have already guessed the reason). It’s aged. Erik Espinosa pointed this out while I was giving my review on Kiss my Ash Radio (the July 21, 2012 episode), which is put on by Smoke Inn. Aging cigars is a good idea and maybe people who like medium bodied cigars would love this cigar but I didn’t like the first two thirds. There’s a season for everything but that season passed for the first two thirds.

And then the final third happened. Spice, oak and bread never tasted so good. It was an explosion of flavor that made the whole cigar worth it for me. Well, almost. It’s still an expensive cigar and a third is still a third, which isn’t enough.

Excellent draw and burn throughout, which is something to be expected with Chisels. The first two thirds were medium bodied while the last third was definitely full bodied. This really is a Tale of Two Cigars. It was almost like the cigar had been resting on its head for the last two years and all the flavors settled on the bottom. The first two thirds would have earned 87 points from me but the last third was a 96 point cigar. Averaging it out…

90 points

PS: Over the weekend I smoked a Litto Gomez Diez 2012 and it was fantastic. It was like the final third of the 2010 but throughout the whole cigar.

La Flor Dominicana Air Bender Cigar Review

July 6, 2012 · Posted in Cigar Review · Comment 

For those of you with a good memory you are right, I have reviewed an Air Bender in the past. I thought it was alright but not something I would ever search out to smoke again. Which, when I think about it, is a shame because I do like the La Flor Dominicana Double Ligero line of cigars, especially the Chisels (Chisel Reviews: Natural and Maduro). So I decided to try the Air Bender in the Chisel vitola. What could go wrong?

Based on how it looks there isn’t much that “could go wrong” with this cigar. It’s very oily, perfectly shaped, has a slight reddish hue to it and not much in the way of veins. Alright, this isn’t the Constitution, no need for much of a preamble.

Cigar Stats
Vitola: Chisel ~ toro
Length: 6 ½”
Ring Gauge: 54
Wrapper: Ecuador Habano
Binder: Dominican Republic
Filler: Dominican Republic
Price: $160.00/Box of 20 | $9.00/Single

Preamble Fireworks!

It starts out great with a blast of white pepper with leather… and that “blast” doesn’t quit throughout the first third. But don’t get the wrong idea; it’s not by any means a super strong cigar. Barely full bodied.

The second third just continues along the same lines as the first third. I think that the “blast” has dissipated a bit but I’m thinking that’s just a result of the constant barrage of white pepper, which I love. The leather is still present and, new to the flavor party, is oak. It’s a great mix of flavors and the addition of oak has only added to my enjoyment.

If you are a fan of pepper, particularly white pepper, you will enjoy this cigar to no end. The consistency of the smoke is very granular, almost like a mist. Basically, what that means is that with each puff that white pepper coats your tongue and sticks around for a long time. It’s nice.

The final third is mostly white pepper because, at this point, it’s overpowering the other flavors. There is still a hint of leather bouncing around in the flavor profile.

The La Flor Dominicana Air Bender Chisel is not an overly complex cigar but the flavors that are there are wonderful. Let me put it this way: I bought a couple, smoked those in quick succession and then went out and bought a few more. It took a good amount of self constraint on my part to hold a cigar back to do this review. I liked it that much.

As with almost every other Chisel I have ever smoked both the draw and the burn were excellent. The strength of this cigar starts out barely in the full bodied range but it builds into this onslaught that pounds you. There is some variability to this; sometimes the strength was there but wasn’t punishing but at other times it became quite strong.

Personally, I wouldn’t suggest this cigar for somebody who doesn’t like full bodied cigars. For those of you who do like full bodied cigars then you should try this Chisel. Is it my favorite Chisel? No. The LFD DL Chisel Maduro is still my favorite. But the LFD Air Bender Chisel is great for a change of pace.

93 points

Chisel Cigar Shape Trademark

May 9, 2012 · Posted in Cigar Industry · Comment 

Yup, that’s right. Litto Gomez has trademarked the chisel shape in a cigar. As far as I or Cigar Aficionado know this is the first time that a cigar shape (vitola) got trademarked.

Here’s some of the story from CA:

The La Flor Dominicana Chisel, one of the strongest and most original cigars on the market, is now protected by a trademark. Cigarmaker Litto Gomez, who created the Chisel shape in 2003, received acceptance for his trademark application on April 4. The trademark for the Chisel shape is retroactive to 2006, and will be valid until 2016.

“I thought it was a long shot,” Gomez told Cigar Aficionado in an interview yesterday. “They rejected it four or five times—we kept trying.”

While not a goof on Litto Gomez’s part, when I first heard about this I immediately thought about this (watch the whole thing):

Now, I love the La Flor Dominicana Double Ligero Chisel (Natural Review and Maduro Review) but this just seems wrong. Even though there haven’t been a proliferation of chisel shaped cigars there are some and I liked the Man O’ War Special Project 52-C, which is a chisel shape. Does this mean these cigars will cease to exist? Maybe not, as long as they can make a deal with Mr. Gomez.

I appreciate the fact that the chisel shape is unique but I don’t think if another cigar maker comes out with a great chisel shaped cigar it would hurt Litto Gomez’s cigars in any way. They are legendary and, speaking for myself, I will always cherish the chisel shape. Now, I guess I’m limited in my chisel options.

The chisel’s raison d’être is the fact that it smokes extremely well. I have never had one with a bad draw or burn. For whatever physical reason these cigars just smoke awesomely. And now? Oh well.

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